Is it true that I’m buying a new one Laptops should postpone because Windows 11 is on its way?

Is it true that I'm buying a new one Laptops should postpone because Windows 11 is on its way?

Tech Highlights:

  • Here’s what we know so far. Windows 11 is coming Oct. 5, though not to every PC right away. (You may have to wait until mid-2022 to install it.) The system requirements as outlined by Microsoft would seem to cover nearly any Windows PC sold today. To make sure Windows 11 will work on your current computer, you can install Microsoft’s PC Health Check here. Must-haves for Windows 11 include at least 4GB of RAM, 64GB of storage and a 720p display measuring over 9 inches diagonally. The company also says, “Windows 11 Home edition requires internet connectivity and a Microsoft account to complete device setup on first use.”

  • It’s one of the biggest technology buying hangups: Is my new purchase going to be immediately obsolete? Or at least outdated? That kind of FOMO can lead to long delays in buying a laptop, phone or tablet, always waiting for the next update or upgrade. With the announcement of Windows 11, laptop and desktop shoppers are in this familiar situation.

a screen shot of a computer: Should you buy a new Windows laptop now, or wait for Windows 11?© CNET Should you buy a new Windows laptop now, or wait for Windows 11? Here are the system requirements for Windows 11.How to check whether your laptop will run Windows 11 For Mac and iPhone or iPad users, the annual operating system upgrade has become largely seamless. Changes are generally incremental and downloading and installing the updates is easy. And because there are only a handful of hardware variations, all made by Apple, there are few (but not zero) compatibility problems.

an open laptop computer sitting on top of a wooden table: Microsoft also makes its own line fo Surface PCs, including the Surface Go. Dan Ackerman/CNET© Provided by CNET Microsoft also makes its own line fo Surface PCs, including the Surface Go. Dan Ackerman/CNET. Since its launch in 2015, major Windows 10 updates have all gone smoothly on any PCs I’ve used or tested. As Windows 11 appears to be a modest overall update, focused in large part on the appearance of menu bars and grouped windows, I — at this moment — have no qualms about buying a Windows 10 laptop now and waiting for the free Windows 11 update later this year.

But there have always been legit reasons to keep your old hardware on its current OS and not upgrade. The switch between Windows 7 and Windows 8 was… rocky. Many people skipped Windows 8 and held out for Windows 10, which was much better. Some of those holdouts even resisted Windows 10, with some valid concerns.

You can also easily stick with Windows 10 for now, if you’d rather. That OS will continue to be supported with updates and patches (and most importantly, security updates) until at least 2025. The gaming updates coming to Windows 11 are mostly based on the Xbox app, and any updates there should come to Windows 10 as well. And if you upgrade to Windows 11 later, I don’t see any reason it should affect gaming hardware.

If you’re thinking of buying a new laptop now, I don’t see any major CPU/GPU updates coming before next year that would change my mind. Nvidia’s latest 3000-series mobile chips started showing up in laptops earlier this year (although it’s possible the Ti versions of those may show up in laptops at some point).

Microsoft further says PC makers including Dell, HP, Lenovo and others are planning “hundreds of new Windows 11 designs” for the holiday season. In some operating system overhauls, that can mean interesting new hardware with valuable new features.

Windows 8 was a great example of that. That OS launched alongside a dizzying array of inventive (or just plain weird) new hybrid laptops designed to take advantage of the new touch features built into Windows 8. a laptop computer sitting on top of a wooden table: One of the weird and occasionally wonderful new laptop designs that launched alongside Windows 8 in 2012. I don’t expect anything as revolutionary this time around.© Provided by CNET One of the weird and occasionally wonderful new laptop designs that launched alongside Windows 8 in 2012. I don’t expect anything as revolutionary this time around. For Windows 11, with the promise of new built-for-Windows-11 systems, there may be new design ideas and new hardware features we haven’t seen yet. But aside from potentially haptic feedback for pens, I haven’t heard anything that would make me think I’ll miss out by buying a new laptop now.

Based on what we know right now, if you’re already about to pull the trigger on a Windows laptop purchase, I think you can move forward without worrying about it. If any new information causes my opinion to change, I’ll let you know. Prime Day laptop deals still available: Big savings on MacBook Air, Lenovo, Samsung Galaxy Book Pro and more
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