Canada judge rejects Huawei CFO’s push to use employee statements as evidence in U.S. extradition case

Canada judge rejects Huawei CFO’s push to use employee statements as evidence in U.S. extradition case

News: Canada judge rejects Huawei CFO’s push to use employee statements as evidence in U.S. extradition case.

VANCOUVER (Reuters) – The Canadian extradition judge of Menwe Wanzhou, CFO of Huawei, denied her request to accept evidence from Huawei employees contradicting a U.S. claim that she had bankers about the company’s business in the Iran misled.

However, the judge provisionally allowed parts of an opinion requested by Meng’s team to be admitted as evidence, subject to further elaboration on its relevance, as the judgment showed.

Meng, 49, was arrested at Vancouver International Airport in December 2018 on a US arrest warrant for misleading HBSC for misleading Huawei’s dealings in Iran and for causing the bank to violate US sanctions.

She has since fought against house arrest in Vancouver and has declared she was innocent.

The evidence Meng’s team wanted to add related to their claim that HSBC knew about Huawei’s business in Iran and that Meng did not mislead the bank.

Two affidavits came from Huawei employees attending the meeting where the United States alleged Meng lied about the company’s business dealings in Iran.

British Columbia Supreme Court Deputy Chief Justice Heather Holmes said admitting evidence “can only result in credibility statements being made” and turned the case into one he said, she said.

Holmes also declined two additional affidavits from Huawei employees alleging that HSBC employees were aware of Huawei’s ties to companies in Iran and said they were going beyond the “reasonable scope” of an extradition negotiation.

“The difficulty Ms. Meng faces is that this evidence relates to issues related to a trial, not the extradition hearing,” wrote Holmes.

Holmes tentatively allowed portions of an expert’s report on the application of the US Sanctions Act to financial institutions, stating that he could address a potentially misleading aspect of the US evidence. However, she said more submissions would be needed to prove its relevance.

Meng is expected to appear in court on Monday as her case enters the final stage of the argument, which is set to close in May.

Huawei did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Reporting from Moira Warburton in Vancouver; Adaptation by Leslie Adler and Cynthia Osterman

Original Source © Reuters

The Techgadgetguides is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com Inc.
Tech Reviews and Guides | TGG
Logo
Compare items
  • Total (0)
Compare
0