Top 10 Best Cameras For Professionals In The World

Even in the world of professional photography, which was once dominated by full-frame DSLRs and medium-sized cameras, the future seems increasingly mirrorless. It is about a large sensor and as many functions as possible in a body that is just as portable as its manufacturer can. For Professionals, the DSLR still has its place, and Nikon and Canon continue to dominate the show here, but there is no doubt that Sony’s and Fujifilm are furious with some well-executed own products.

So, do you have to stick to tradition or take a courageous step toward another, probably smaller setup? Whichever way you jump, we have some solutions and suggestions to make your landing easier. Today, we have compiled a list of Best Cameras For Professionals in the world. Have a look at them in our comparison table below and then we’ll discuss each one of them one by one.

Best Cameras For Professionals Comparison Table

Cameras For Professionals
Camera NameMegapixelsMax Video Resolution
Nikon D85045.7MP4K
Sony A7R III42.2MP4K
Hasselblad X1D-50c50.0MP1080p
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV30.4MP4K
Fujifilm GFX 50S51.4MP1080p
Panasonic Lumix GH520.3MP4K
Sony A924.2MP4K
Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II20.4MP4K
Pentax K-136.4MP1080p
Sony A7S II12.2MP4K

Here are the Top 10 Best Cameras For Professionals

Nikon D850

The brand’s newest full-frame DSLR gets a sizeable hike in resolution for bigger prints

  • Type: DSLR
  • Sensor: Full-frame
  • Megapixels: 45.7MP
  • Lens mount: Nikon F
  • Screen: 3.2in tilting touchscreen, 2.3million dots
  • Viewfinder: Optical
  • Max burst speed: 7fps
  • Max video resolution: 4K
  • User level: Professional

It is not quite the flagship model in Nikon’s line-up – the honor goes to the more action-oriented D5 – but if you want to know more or if you want to print large, the Nikon D850 is the best camera for professionals right now. This weatherproof magnesium alloy camera has a great 45.7MP sensor, with a new 0.75x optical viewfinder, the largest magnification factor ever found on an FX-format (ie full screen) Nikon DSLR. In addition, it can record 4K UHD video without trimming the sensor to 30 fps, so users can take full advantage of their lens collection.

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It is not surprising that, given all these heavyweight specifications, there are two card slots, one for SDHC/SDXC cards and the other for the XQD format. Since this is a bit of a beast, weighing 1005 grams, the deeper grip on this model is appreciated, as is the fact that we now have an impressive 153 AF points for locking the target. This D850 was long on the road and delivers exactly what the average pro needs. All such features make it the best camera for professionals.

Pros:

  • Large and bright viewfinder
  • A sophisticated and proven AF system

Cons:

  • Costly

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Sony A7R III

A huge pixel count and performance tweaks make this a more-than-capable rival to the traditional DSLRs

  • Type: Mirrorless
  • Sensor: Full-frame
  • Megapixels: 42.2 MP
  • Lens mount: Sony
  • Screen: 3in tilting touchscreen, 1.44 million dots
  • Viewfinder: EVF
  • Max burst speed: 10fps
  • Max video resolution: 4K
  • User level: Enthusiast/Professional

A relatively portable full-frame camera with a huge 42.2 MP resolution for photos; it is easy to see the appeal of the weather-dependent third iteration of the popular A7R from Sony. Part of his fascination is that it offers a number of features of the more expensive A9, such as the same EVF and an LCD screen with a tiltable screen, as well as the joystick-like controls for adjusting the AF point. The AF system has also been improved from the mark II option, with a blend of 399 phase detect AF points and 425 contrast detecting AF points, and the camera does a great job tracking a subject around the frame, which also makes it work good, suitable for the sports field since it is a photo studio. The menu system is also overhauled, now color-coded and slightly easier to navigate. All such features make it one of the best cameras for professionals who are looking for a mirrorless camera.

Pros:

  • Relatively compact for a full frame
  • High-end video options including 4K

Cons:

  • Battery life could be better
  • Limited touchscreen control

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Hasselblad X1D-50c

A mirrorless, medium format camera that not only changes the game; it redesigns the pitch

  • Type: Medium format mirrorless
  • Sensor: Medium format
  • Megapixels: 50MP
  • Lens mount: Hasselblad X
  • Screen: 3in touchscreen, 920K dots
  • Viewfinder: EVF, 2.36million dots
  • Max burst speed: 2.3fps
  • Max video resolution: 1080p
  • User level: Professional

Because it is a medium-sized camera with a resolution of no less than 50 MP, the X1D-50c needs more care and attention than the average camera if you want to be rewarded with spectacular, detailed images. Thanks to the design without a mirror, the X1D-50c is a fraction of the size of a traditional camera of medium size and hardly any larger than a DSLR. Of course, it is not cheap, but the price tag does put it within the reach of both professionals and well-to-do enthusiasts. The controls are minimal, but everything you need can be found here and if you do not like taking pictures on the rear screen, you can use an electronic viewfinder instead. Admittedly, it lacks the speed of a smaller size DSLR or mirrorless model, but still, this is one of the best cameras for professionals.

Pros:

  • Stunning image quality
  • Beautifully finished and lightweight

Cons:

  • Start-up time a little slow
  • Some handling quirks

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Canon EOS 5D Mark IV

If you can digest the price, you’ll be blown away by this upgraded workhorse’s performance

  • Type: DSLR
  • Sensor: Full-frame
  • Megapixels: 30.4MP
  • Lens mount: Canon EF
  • Screen: 3.2in touchscreen, 1.62million dots
  • Viewfinder: Optical
  • Max burst speed: 7fps
  • Max video resolution: 4K
  • User level: Professional

Very suitable for a wide range of subjects, if you prefer to use a full SLR camera than a mirrorless model, this dust-sealed EOS DSLR may be the camera you will ever need. The 30.4MP sensor is quite a jump above the 22.3 MP that you found in the previous EOS 5D Mark III model, even if it is not quite industry-leading, while Dual Pixel Raw technology also offers photographers the ability to fine-tune the area of maximum sharpness after the catch. The EOS 5D Mark IV is also inherited by Canon’s Dual Pixel AF technology, which means there are AF points for phase detection on the image sensor itself, which promises faster AF acquisition than we do on EOS 5D Mark III in live view and on the recording video.

With its professional look, we also get dual card slots – one for SD-type media and the other for CompactFlash – and despite the fact that more techies have been implemented, Canon has succeeded in reducing body weight while maintaining excellent performance. The 4K video comes with a number of limitations, such as MJPEG compression and a serious crop factor, but with excellent image quality and many other advantages, it remains one of the most comprehensive and one of the best cameras for professionals we’ve seen so far.

Pros:

  • Responsive touchscreen
  • Impressive live-view AF

Cons:

  • Various 4K video limitations
  • Expensive next to rival bodies

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Fujifilm GFX 50S

Medium format mirrorless camera for those requiring massive amounts of detail

  • Type: Medium format mirrorless
  • Sensor: Medium format
  • Megapixels: 51.4MP
  • Lens: Fujifilm G mount
  • Screen: 3.2in touchscreen, 2.36million dots
  • Viewfinder: Hybrid (optical and electronic)
  • Max burst speed: 3fps
  • Max video resolution: 1080p
  • User level: Professional

Fujifilm’s impressive digital medium format debut, the GFX 50S has a magnesium alloy housing, with a tilting EFF of 3.69 million dots that can be removed when it’s not needed. We also get a tilting 3.2-inch touchscreen on the back and a compact LCD window on the top where the most important settings are displayed. Despite its large sensor and dazzling specification sheet, it does not feel too cumbersome to hold; the grip is comfortable and the camera is nicely balanced, with the body weather-resistant and dust-proof to boot.

The AF performance is solid if it is not too fast, but it is precise, which means that this is a camera for more recorded recordings. Burst recordings are up to a modest 3fps, but this is not a camera designed for sports or action, more for the same kind of images as the Hasselblad X1D-50c above. The GFX 50S handles its large 117 MB files with ease and writes files to the card without any delay in performance. As a Fujifilm model, we also get the popular collection of film simulation modes from the company. If ultimate image quality is the goal, then this is one of the best cameras for professionals.

Pros:

  • Very accurate autofocus
  • Weather-sealed body

Cons:

  • AF can be a little slow
  • The awkward EV compensation control

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Panasonic Lumix GH5

Feature-filled mirrorless camera for photographers that need high-quality video options

  • Type: Mirrorless
  • Sensor: Micro Four Thirds
  • Megapixels: 20.3MP
  • Lens mount: Micro Four Thirds mount
  • Screen: 3.2in touchscreen, 1.62million dots
  • Viewfinder: EVF
  • Max burst speed: 12fps
  • Max video resolution: 4K
  • User level: Enthusiast/Professional

Looking for one of the best 4K video recording cameras out there? The weatherproof, dustproof and even freeze-resistant GH5 should be high on your wish list. The high-end professional set feels like a real inch and with an amazingly high resolution 3.88 million point-resolution electronic viewfinder that gives a lifelike picture, the camera offers an excellent user experience. You can also compose images and videos with the 3.2-inch LCD screen on the back, which not only responds to touch, but is also useful for quickly shifting the AF point, but also for tilting and turning.

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The camera also comes with the Panasonic 6K PHOTO, which allows you to extract 18MP photos from the ultra-high-quality video with 30 fps. There is no LCD on the top plate, but we do get thick discs for discs and modes, along with buttons for direct access to white balance, ISO and exposure compensation. Dynamic range is very good and it is possible to restore a good level of detail of JPEG files. So overall, this one of the best cameras for professionals that you can buy right now.

Pros:

  • Excellent video specs
  • Superb viewfinder

Cons:

  • Image quality not quite best in class
  • ISO range could be broader

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Sony A9

Ideal for sports and action but with a well-rounded spec sheet that makes it versatile enough for plenty more

  • Type: Mirrorless
  • Sensor: Full Frame
  • Megapixels: 24.2MP
  • Lens: Sony E mount
  • Screen: 3in tilting touchscreen, 1.44million dots
  • Viewfinder: EVF
  • Max burst speed: 20fps
  • Max video resolution: 4K
  • User level: Professional

We thought we were okay with the ever-growing A7-series cameras, and then the A9 came. The AF system of the camera is not only incredibly fast, but the following performance is first class, so if speed is the priority, then this is where you have to look. Combine that with 20 fps burst recording for 241 raw files or 362 JPEG images and a large and bright EVF that does not obscure while shooting and you have a camera that can easily compete with the best Canon and Nikon have to offer as it is about shooting actions.

The light-sensitive range can be extended to a setting corresponding to ISO 204,800, and on top of that excellent EVF, we have a 3-inch tilting LCtouchscreenen that has a respectably high resolution of 1.44 million pixels. It is not surprising that Sony also gets 4K video photos plus the Full HD option at up to 120 fps. The battery life may not be at the same level as that of the Nikon D5 and Canon EOS-1D X Mark II, but what it does offer, has undoubtedly forced many users to reconsider whether they still have the kit that best suits their needs.

Pros:

  • Blisteringly fast AF
  • Blackout-free burst shooting

Cons:

  • Limited touchscreen control
  • Battery life, not pro-DSLR level

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Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II

Flagship mirrorless camera offering a classic design but also high-tech imaging performance

  • Type: Mirrorless
  • Sensor: Micro Four Thirds
  • Megapixels: 20.4MP
  • Lens mount: Micro Four Thirds mount
  • Screen: 3in articulating touchscreen, 1.037million dots
  • Viewfinder: EVF
  • Max burst speed: 60fps
  • Max video resolution: 4K
  • User level: Enthusiast/Professional

The best Micro Four Thirds camera so far? The weather-resistant option is decisive for those who are in favor of classic design and traditional service and is currently as good as possible from Olympus. The manufacturer has overhauled the original iteration of the camera to deliver a 20 MP Micro Four Thirds sensor, a greatly improved 121-point cross-type AF system and a significantly enhanced sensor-based image stabilization system, while also providing 4K video and Olympus’s best recording video functions deliver data. The electronic viewfinder has also been modified, now with a resolution of 2.36 million pixels, making it easy to forget that what you use is electronic instead of optical. The Mark II is also remarkably faster on the draw, while the images are full of details, helped by that excellent stabilization technology. Such specs and features make it one of the best cameras for professionals.

Pros:

  • Superb AF system
  • Highly effective image stabilization

Cons:

  • Dense menu system
  • As expensive as full-frame rivals

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Pentax K-1

Competitively priced DSLR with a robust build and surprisingly flexible tilting LCD

  • Type: DSLR
  • Sensor: Full frame
  • Megapixels: 36.4MP
  • Lens mount: Pentax K mount
  • Screen: 3.2in tilting, 1.037million dots
  • Viewfinder: Optical
  • Max burst speed: 4.4fps
  • Max video resolution: 1080p
  • User level: Enthusiast/Professional

In the K-1, we have the advantage of a full-frame, high-resolution sensor, five-axis image stabilization and a host of useful features unique to Pentax, all in a robust magnesium alloy case. All connections and ports are sealed to prevent ingress of dust and moisture, and the camera can stay happy at temperatures of -10 ° C. The default information display on the main screen is clear and changes quickly when the settings are changed, while the presence of a PRIME IV processing engine makes it faster than the previous engine found in other K-series models (by 50%, according to Pentax).

As DSLR we get a traditional optical viewfinder, which is large and clear and offers 100% image coverage, plus a 3.2 inch tiltable LCD screen on the back, which also provides a clear picture. A built-in GPS unit and a digital compass make it ideal for the more adventurous photographer, while LED lights on the camera make it easier to work in the dark. The Mark II version of this model has also been announced recently, but until we test it, we stick to the original for this list.

Pros:

  • Excellent features-to-price ratio
  • High-resolution sensor

Cons:

  • Slow AF system
  • No 4K video

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Sony A7S II

If low-light shooting and video are your things, the A7S II is the one for you

  • Type: Mirrorless
  • Sensor: Full-frame
  • Megapixels: 12.2MP
  • Lens mount: Sony E-mount
  • Screen: 3in tilting, 1.228million dots
  • Viewfinder: EVF, 2.36million dots
  • Max burst speed: 5fps
  • Max video resolution: 4K
  • User level: Enthusiast/Professional

The latest model from the A7 series from Sony may be the A7 III, but the older A7S II is definitely more suitable for low-light and pro-class video recording, so it just deserves its place on the list for that model. The fact that the full frame sensor only contains 12MP means that it can offer a wide dynamic range and an ISO 100-102.400 sensitivity range that can be extended to an amazingly high ISO 409.600 equivalent option. 4K video recording without pixel binning, along with the option to use frame rates up to 120 fps when recording Full HD footage and S-Gamut3.Cine / S-Log3 options, makes it a great choice for videographers, while sensor-based five -As image stabilization system is a huge bonus – especially in low light, where the camera is most likely to be used.

Pros:

  • Huge ISO range
  • A broad range of video options

Cons:

  • 12MP limits versatility
  • Video button awkwardly placed

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Final Words

Sometimes the newest is not necessarily the best. The new camera manufacturers that offer their professional model lines mean nothing to photographers in the field. Given this range of possibilities, selecting the 10 best cameras for professionals can easily become a stubborn and sometimes snarky debate. But here, we have done our best to compile the list of Best Cameras For Professionals, and we hope that this list will help you find your ideal camera.

Top 10 Best DSLR Cameras

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