Top 4 Linux network managers

ifconfig

Part of the command line toolkit, ifconfig can be used in your CLI or terminal emulator and is the foundation of network management – many different network management tools do this as part of the package, while some people choose to use the direct. Consult the documents for instructions on the options available

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Ifconfig

Easy to use

As a command line tool, ease of use can be very subjective. Learning from scratch is much more difficult than determining how individual elements work in a graphical tool. That said, once you understand exactly what you’re doing, it can be quick and really useful.

Resources

There are many hidden features in ifconfig for various connection configurations, such as MTUs and tunneling, along with the basic features desired for obtaining a wired or wireless network configuration. There is no proxy control going on, although you can attach to the settings, this means that you will want an external program for this.

Customization

Because it is a command line tool, it is dangerously customizable, as any function can actually be completed the way you need it – it will simply break the connection in a simpler way than you could with graphical instruments. In addition, this means that you can extract external data to insert your fields, which other tools do not allow.

Privacy

IP encapsulation is the only factor you can do when it comes to privacy without bringing in an external proxy or Tor tools. Tor is much more powerful than the tools you can get for ifconfig, however, some additional type of Privacy management would be a great addition if the tool had to be updated.

In general

5/10

Ifconfig is a simple command line tool that does the job for which it was designed and very well at it. If you are running a command line interface, it is still an excellent way to configure your network.

GNOME Network

An easy application that you will discover in many rounds of Ubuntu and that has been around for years, the GNOME Community application is a simplified network connection supervisor that closely accompanies the design of GNOME. In addition, it is one that most people have used at some point.

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GNOME Network

Easy to use

As a GNOME application, the Network is easy to navigate and organized very clearly and easily in a single window. All the main options can be found here, with advanced advanced settings available via a clearly identified button. It’s the traditional GNOME design, however, instead of taking the options away, it just makes everything a little easier to access.

Resources

There is a first class option of features accessible across the network, with advanced configuration for multiple networks that you have configured. In addition, there is an airplane mode, such as a cell phone, and another example that GNOME is thinking more about when it comes to portable computing today.

Customization

Each wired and wi-fi has very nice personalization controls, allowing full control over IPv4 and v6 addresses, along with various security controls and even the flexibility to turn wireless communications into an access point. It is the same as you would get from something like ifconfig, however, it offered much better.

Privacy

In addition to the airplane mode mentioned above, which is quite good for simply interrupting all entries, there are easy proxy controls that can be used throughout the system to provide a little more security on the Internet. They are nothing on Tor, but they do much more than your normal connections.

Total

8/10

The community is one of the few applications that we really like about GNOME, because the simplification course simplified use and did not harm the entire application. If you use it by default, you have an ideal application.

Network Tools

Once again pre-installed on many Ubuntu spins, Network Tools is the most superior equivalent to GNOME Network. Offering all kinds of functionality, it is usually the main port of call for many who wish to perform extra community detection tasks involved or determine problems.

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Community instruments

Easy to use

Although a little more intimidating for newbies, the Network Instruments main tab has almost everything you want for regular network management, although it depends on the standard wifi system that manages the location it can. The extra advanced features are clearly labeled.

Resources

There are a huge amount of different network resources, not only to connect and see what’s round, but also to test the network in case of problems. It manages much more than just your native network adapters; he can handle his entire community if that is a factor that you want him to do.

Customization

It is good for many sniffing and routing tools, but for the actual network connection it is somewhat absent. It’s good that you’re able to run custom network detection functions, however we’re focusing a little more on actually connecting to the network in this scan.

Privacy

In addition to discovering vulnerabilities in your network, there is no solution to actually making your connection private from within the application itself. No proxy, no tunneling and definitely no Tor tools either. It is somewhat ironic that you can solve problems together with your network and then not be able to fix them on your laptop.

In general

6/10

Network Tools is great for specific use, however, to really manage network connections, it gets a little shy. Although it is not likely that it is your fault, it is good that you want a correct and fast appearance through your network.

Wicd

A thing of a rising star, Wicd has appeared as the default network manager in more and more Linux distros lately. It also has a variety of interesting options, along with few dependencies and separate profiles for each network connection.

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Wicd

Easy to use

Putting everything you need at the entrance, Wicd simplifies connection to any wi-fi community, in addition to having nice controls for wired networks. Any configuration menus are also linked to personal connections and there are some quick options for disconnecting everything and turning off Wi-Fi.

Resources

In addition to the functions in the preferences of the individual connections, there are some advanced configurations accessible through the interface to extract a little more from the network, from deciding which external programs to use when making adjustments when changing drivers as well.

Customization

Virtually every part of the network is somehow configurable – from the network’s IP and ID settings to the best way that drivers and low-down programs come together and work together. This allows you to really get the ideal connection settings for just about any situation and goes far beyond the opposite applications in this check.

Privacy

For all the editing and personalization you can do for connections and personal adapters, there are no proxy tools and an almost hidden encapsulation option. It could be something you would use in conjunction with Tor, if you want to have a little more privacy.

In general

9/10

From a limited collection of managers, Wicd is clearly the perfect group. Its popularity is well deserved in this case; it’s good to see him appearing more and more in the distros as the standard manager.

And the winner is…

Wicd

In fact, it was complicated, with the battle ultimately on the GNOME Network and Wicd; however, in the end, it was the wide variety of deeply customizable options and the good design of Wicd that gave him the advantage. While the GNOME Community is a better looking and better functioning GNOME application than most, the minimal design is not for everyone – especially those who want to get into an extra element in certain aspects of their network and connections. With Wicd, having all the tools and information available does not translate into the kind of complexity you get with Network Tools. Instead, it is as simple to use as the GNOME Network, but with much more so you can really play.

In terms of features, we especially like the separate connection profiles – a real benefit if you switch between connections that require completely different configurations very often. Greater than that, however, it is true that all the superior options are extremely configurable. If you need to overcome the usual daily use of a network supervisor, chances are you have not
to opt for secondary software, as in the GNOME Community. Except, after all, you are involved with the lack of privacy options – our only real complaint with this in any other case, excellent network manager.

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