Top 10 Best DSLR Cameras Of 2019

Which DSLR camera is best? Which should I buy for filming high-quality videos and photos? These are some of the questions that we have seen while continuing our research on Best DSLR Cameras. When it comes to making videos, the standard for having a decent DSLR camera has become quite solid. We used to see a large number of “camcorders” and other easily identifiable models dominated the market in the early 2000s, but they are not even made! You can always take the professional route, but sometimes they are not that slim, budget-friendly or just what people want. DSLR cameras are extremely popular for some reason, so let’s see which models have made the film for video recording.

What Is a DSLR Camera?

DSLR cameras (which represent “digital single-lens reflex”) are the most popular types of cameras (both for photography and for filming video) and will remain so for a long time. There was a reason why our video camera buying guide has quite a few DSLRs. For a quick overview of how they work, these specific cameras use a special reflex design that differentiates them from your daily digital camera. The design allows light to travel through a lens and also a mirror that can be combined as the mechanism that directs the image/video to the built-in image sensor. This enables higher quality and more efficient technology that is built into the camera.

Although we have seen the increase in mirrorless cameras for video (still worth considering if you have a high budget, although the differences between DSLR and mirrorless require some insight), DSLR cameras are considered by many to be one of the best choices not only for photography, but also for filming videos (except maybe action cameras that also continue to grow, but they are pretty specific with regard to use and who they attract). We think you have made a great decision to invest in one, and it will last for many years to come.

Best DSLR Cameras Comparison Table

Best DSLR Cameras
Camera NameMegapixelsMax Video Resolution
Nikon D85045.7MP4K
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV30.4MP4K
Nikon D75024.3MP1080p
Canon EOS 6D Mark II26.2MP1080p
Canon EOS-1D X Mark II20.2MP4K
Nikon D750020.9MP4K
Canon EOS 5DS/5DS R50.6MP1080p
Canon EOS 7D Mark II20.2MP1080p
Nikon D50020.9MP4K
Canon EOS 80D24.2MP1080p

How To Choose The Best DSLR Cameras?

  • Your Budget – Most of the Best DSLR cameras that are worth watching that we’ve included here do not fall below $300, while others that offer you first-class quality and general additive features will exceed $1000. How much money you have on hand to invest in your DSLR camera will really steer you in the direction.
  • Lenses – Many of these DSLR video cameras come with a standard lens that works fine when filming videos. Unless you go for a specific look and know what you’re looking for, using what’s in the box will work great. If you do indeed purchase a “Body Only” package, you want to purchase a lens to make it work correctly. For those who are not concerned with the technical, beautiful lens look and want something just to make their 1080p videos, grab a high-valued budget-friendly lens that is no more than a hundred dollars or two. Otherwise, we recommend reading our articles for a DSLR lens article if you want something spiffy.

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  • Additional Features – First of all, we ensured that each of the recommended models included at least 1080p HD recordings (30 fps if possible). In addition, what extra functions you want in your DSLR video camera really depends on your taste, such as filters, continuous shooting modes (for photography) and more.
  • Video Quality – As mentioned earlier, the standard now comes to 1080p or is not worth it. If you can get a DSLR camera that also delivers up to 30 fps, you are in the right place in the long run. However, if you want to go a step further and want to be more advanced, you can start by looking at the compression types, digic processors and the overall quality that the specific model offers. We have tried to shed some light on this subject where it applies, otherwise, we have made sure that every recommendation has given us the 1080p standard HD video clips. As can be seen in our best 4K video camera line, it still has a long way to go before it is affordable, supported by devices and more popularly recorded in cameras (especially DSLRs).
  • Extra Accessories – Besides the fact that you need some solid video editing software to finalize your videos, popular accessories include tripods, (as mentioned above) lenses, belts, bags and more. Do you need other items besides your DSLR video camera? Some eCommerce stores sell camera packages that contain them and can appeal to you.
  • Nikon VS Canon – As you will notice, there are actually only Nikon and Canon DSLR video cameras that dominate the market. This debate between Canon and Nikon is relatively popular with video camera enthusiasts, but our recommendation is to keep in mind that a brand is a brand and to choose a model that you think fits your needs as opposed to a name that does not a name is based on the camera. The article linked to the debate also sheds light on the differences if you need more help in this category.
Here are the Top 10 Best DSLR Cameras

Nikon D850

  • Type: DSLR
  • Sensor: Full frame
  • Megapixels: 45.7MP
  • Lens mount: Nikon FX
  • Screen: 3.2in tilting touchscreen, 2,359,000 dots
  • Viewfinder: Pentaprism
  • Max burst speed: 7fps
  • Max video resolution: 4K
  • User level: Enthusiast/professional

The legendary Nikon D800 and D810 set new standards in high-resolution Nikon DSLRs and the Nikon D850 pushes things even further, raising the resolution from 36.3MP to 45.7MP, making it one of the best DSLR cameras. It has the same high-tech measuring module on Nikon’s high-end D5 and D500 DSLRs, as well as an improved autofocus system with 153 instead of 53 points and an increase of the maximum continuous recording speed from 5 fps to 7 fps. You can increase the drive rate to 9 fps by adding the optional MB-D18 battery grip and EN-EL 18b battery. 4K movie recording is another upgrade. The ultra-high resolution ensures that image quality can start somewhat noisily at a very high ISO setting, so if you shoot in low light, the Nikon D5 and D750 are a better choice.

Pros:

  • Mighty resolving power
  • Pro-grade build but still compact

Cons:

  • Fairly noisy at very high ISO settings
  • The vertical grip is an optional add-on

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Canon EOS 5D Mark IV

  • Type: DSLR
  • Sensor: Full frame
  • Megapixels: 30.4MP
  • Lens mount: Canon EF
  • Screen: 3.2in touchscreen, 1,620,000 dots
  • Viewfinder: Pentaprism
  • Max burst speed: 7fps
  • Max video resolution: 4K
  • User level: Enthusiast/professional

The EOS 5D Mark IV is Canon’s one of best DSLR cameras all the time if you want a fairly high number of megapixels without sacrificing continuous drive speed and clean, noise-free picture quality at very high ISO settings. A newer design than the Canon EOS 5DS and 5DS R cameras (at number 7 in this manual), major improvements are 4K movie recording, a touchscreen interface, relatively fast Live View autofocus thanks to the Dual Pixel CMOS AF image sensor and f/8 compatibility with normal focus with all 61 AF points, instead of just the central point. It features the classic EOS 5D operating system, which is intuitive and easy to live with, and image quality is simply stellar.

Pros:

  • 30.4MP is a good compromise
  • Pro performance, manageable size

Cons:

  • Touchscreen fixed in place
  • The big price jump from EOS 5D Mark III

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Nikon D750

  • Type: DSLR
  • Sensor: Full frame
  • Megapixels: 24.3MP
  • Lens mount: Nikon FX
  • Screen: 3.2in tilting screen, 1,229,000 dots
  • Viewfinder: Pentaprism
  • Max burst speed: 6.5fps
  • Max video resolution: 1080p (Full HD)
  • User level: Enthusiast/professional

If you really need clean, low-noise photos – even at high ISO settings – more than if you need a full resolution, the Nikon D750 is a better choice than the D850 (at number 1 in this list). It is also only about half the price to buy and although it uses a mix of magnesium alloy and polycarbonate body panels instead of a full metal jacket, it still feels pretty robust and well made. The 51-point autofocus system is very professional and measuring is very reliable. The camera does not laugh, although it lacks the absolute speed of most Nikon cameras, with a shutter speed of 1/4000 sec and 6.5 fps, respectively. The layout of buttons and buttons is more consumer than on a professional level, but the D750 is still Nikon’s most attractive, affordable, and one of the best DSLR cameras for many photographers.

Pros:

  • A very good all-around performance
  • Competitively priced

Cons:

  • Less solidly built than the D850

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Canon EOS 6D Mark II

  • Type: DSLR
  • Sensor: Full frame
  • Megapixels: 26.2MP
  • Lens mount: Canon EF
  • Screen: 3.2in vari-angle touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots
  • Viewfinder: Pentaprism
  • Max burst speed: 6.5fps
  • Max video resolution: 1080p (Full HD)
  • User level: Enthusiast

The original EOS 6D dates from 2012, so the EOS 6D Mark II was on its way for a long time. The number of megapixels increases from 20.2 MP to 26.2 MP, which provides a greater resolution, but slightly more noise at high ISO settings. The autofocus system goes from 11 points (one cross type) to 45 points (all cross systems) and the new sensor has Dual Pixel CMOS AF for improved live viewing and autofocus of films. Maximum continuous drive increases from 4.5 fps to 6.5 fps, while the operation is also improved, with a variety angle touch screen and 5-axis stabilization for movie recording. With the addition of NFC and Bluetooth, the EOS 6D Mark II is also better connected. All in all, it is an affordable all-rounder, even if it does not shoot on 4K video, instead only 1080p.

Pros:

  • Packs a lot of upgrades
  • Lightweight for a full-frame DSLR

Cons:

  • Pricier than the original EOS 6D
  • AF points clustered in the center of the frame

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Canon EOS-1D X Mark II

  • Type: DSLR
  • Sensor: Full frame
  • Megapixels: 20.2MP
  • Lens mount: Canon EF
  • Screen: 3.2in touchscreen, 1,620,000 dots
  • Viewfinder: Pentaprism
  • Max burst speed: 14/16fps
  • Max video resolution: 4K
  • User level: Professional

The Canon EOS-1D X Mark II is built like a tank and almost as heavy, but still has very natural handling, thanks to the built-in vertical handle and carefully duplicated control knobs and rotary knobs. Like the competing Nikon D5, (see number 11 in this list), megapixels are sacrificed at full speed. This means that resolving fine details is not the strong point of this DSLR camera, but it offers a blisteringly fast continuous speed of 14 fps, rising to 16 fps in Live View mode. This makes the Canon EOS-1D X Mark II ideal for sports and wildlife shooting, especially since the fast driving speed is supported by a 61-point autofocus system that is excellent in tracking moving subjects. Images remain impressively noise-free, even at very high ISO settings, making it one of the best DSLR cameras you can buy now. Mirrorless rivals can match or beat for continuous recording speeds, but DSLRs such as the EOS-1D X II still determine the roost – for now – on subsequent fast-moving subjects.

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Pros:

  • Very robust, superb handling
  • Super-fast frame rate

Cons:

  • Heavyweight build and price
  • Small megapixel count

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Nikon D7500

  • Type: DSLR
  • Sensor: APS-C
  • Megapixels: 20.9MP
  • Lens mount: Nikon DX
  • Screen: 3.2in tilting touchscreen, 922,000 dots
  • Viewfinder: Pentaprism
  • Max burst speed: 8fps
  • Max video resolution: 4K
  • User level: Enthusiast

The Nikon D7500 combines most of the specifications and functions of the professional Nikon D500 into a smaller and lighter consumer-class housing. As such, it has a more enthusiastic steering control and the bodywork is based on carbon fiber composite instead of magnesium alloy components. However, you get the same 20.9 MP image sensor and EXPEED 5 processor, a 1/8000 sec maximum shutter speed and 4K video recording capabilities as in the D500. There is virtually nothing to choose between the two cameras in terms of image quality, but the D500 has a downgraded 51-point autofocus system instead of 153 points and the autofocus at f/8 is limited to one AF point instead of 15 points. which can be a problem if you shoot with teleconverters. The maximum driving speed is also slower, but still quite powerful with 8 fps. The D7500 is an extremely well-balanced balance between costs and functions for enthusiastic photographers and has a heavy balance with larger lenses that do not fit with mirrorless cameras.

Pros:

  • Has the best bits from the D500
  • Lightweight build

Cons:

  • Less robust than the D500
  • Downgraded autofocus system

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Canon EOS 5DS/5DS R

  • Type: DSLR
  • Sensor: Full frame
  • Megapixels: 50.6MP
  • Lens mount: Canon EF
  • Screen: 3.2in, 1,040,000 dots
  • Viewfinder: Pentaprism
  • Max burst speed: 5fps
  • Max video resolution: 1080p (Full HD)
  • User level: Enthusiast/professional

Based on the very popular, but now replaced EOS 5D Mark III, the Canon EOS 5DS clashes the number of megapixels from 22.3 MP to as much as 50.6 MP. It is one of the best DSLR cameras from Canon for solving fine details and texture, making it better suited for photographers with only photos. The EOS 5DS R goes even further and cancels the anti-aliasing effect of the optical low-pass filter to allow even greater resolution, although there is an increased risk of moiré patterns and fake colors. Both versions of the camera have an improved shutter unit with a smooth operation to prevent the resolution from being affected by camera shake. The disadvantages of all extra megapixels are a relatively limited ISO range with increased image noise at high ISO settings and a slow 5fps maximum driving speed. The 5DS / 5DS R is not a video or sports camera, so if you need a professional digital SLR camera that is more versatile, try the EOS 5D Mark IV above.

Pros:

  • Super-high megapixel count
  • Two versions available

Cons:

  • Limited ISO range
  • Comparatively noisy at high ISOs

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Canon EOS 7D Mark II

  • Type: DSLR
  • Sensor: APS-C
  • Megapixels: 20.2MP
  • Lens mount: Canon EF-S
  • Screen: 3in, 1,040,000 dots
  • Viewfinder: Pentaprism
  • Max burst speed: 10fps
  • Max video resolution: 1080p (Full HD)
  • User level: Enthusiast/professional

Like the EOS 5D series of cameras in design and robust construction with magnesium alloy, the Canon EOS 7D Mark II Canon’s top class APS-C format is DSLR. As with the 6D Mark II, the second edition of the EOS 7D was five years in the making and represents a significant upgrade over that model. A real, faster camera for action photography, with a 65-point wide field autofocus system with ‘Intelligent’ tracking in AI Servo mode and a fast 10 fps continuous drive. Dual DIGIC 6 processors help speed data throughput and the buffer is large enough to enable images with top speed for 31 frames in Raw mode, or enough JPEG images to fill your memory card. As is the case with ‘fast’ DSLRs, the number of megapixels decreases, this time to 20.2 MP. Is the EOS 7D II due for replacement? It starts to lag a bit behind its competitors, especially if you include mirrorless cameras in the mix.

Pros:

  • Pro-grade handling and build quality
  • Great for action shooting

Cons:

  • Modest megapixel count
  • No touchscreen or Wi-Fi

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Nikon D500

  • Type: DSLR
  • Sensor: APS-C
  • Megapixels: 20.9MP
  • Lens mount: Nikon DX
  • Screen: 3.2in tilting touchscreen, 2,359,000 dots
  • Viewfinder: Pentaprism
  • Max burst speed: 10fps
  • Max video resolution: 4K
  • User level: Enthusiast/professional

With the telephoto-enhancing 1.5x crop factor of Nikon’s DX (APS-C) format DSLRs, super fast 10fps drive rate and exceptional memory buffer capacity for up to 200 raw files, the Nikon D500 is one of the best DSLR cameras for sports and nature photography. It is also solidly built, with pro-grade robustness and handling. Indeed, the layout of the controls will be immediately familiar to photographers who have come to love Nikon’s professional DSLR design ethos, so the recording mode dial will be replaced by a button cluster for quick access to important settings, such as the D5 and the D850. At the rear is a ti3.2-inch.2 inch touch screen with a powerful resolution of 2.359k-point, again matching the D850. The D500 is currently the best sporting, pro-class APS-C format DSLR on the market, ahead of the Canon EOS 7D Mark II. It is built to last and the prices have remained high to reflect that.

Pros:

  • Excellent performance
  • Telephoto-boosting DX format

Cons:

  • Lower MP count than most DSLRs
  • Canon 7D Mark II rival is cheaper

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Canon EOS 80D

  • Type: DSLR
  • Sensor: APS-C
  • Megapixels: 24.2MP
  • Lens mount: Canon EF-S
  • Screen: 3in vari-angle touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots
  • Viewfinder: Pentaprism
  • Max burst speed: 7fps
  • Max video resolution: 1080p (Full HD)
  • User level: Enthusiast

While Canon’s EOS 7D Mark II APS-C camera (number eight) is a speed specialist, the Canon EOS 80D is more of an all-rounder. It has a larger number of megapixels of 24.2 MP and a more relaxed yet fairly fast maximum speed of 7 fps. Both DSLR cameras have CMOS AF with the double pixel, but the EOS 80D’s articulated touch screen is much more intuitive for selecting autofocus areas in Live View and when recording movies. The normal 45-point autofocus system is the same as in the full-frame EOS 6D Mark II, but in the EOS 80D, the spread points cover a larger area of the image frame. 27 of the AF points are available at f / 8, instead of just one in the EOS 7D Mark II. Advanced features and smooth controls make the EOS 80D ideal and one of the best DSLR cameras for enthusiastic photographers.

Pros:

  • Relatively compact and lightweight
  • Fully articulated rear screen

Cons:

  • Single memory card slot
  • No Bluetooth (but Wi-Fi and NFC)

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Conclusion

DSLRs have the most extensive selection of lenses and decades of experience to back up. Mirrorless cameras are more compact, but the cost savings are debatable, especially if you add lenses (in all they can be more expensive than DSLRs). For personal and business use we use both types of cameras. If you are a professional in the top segment who wants to shave us, our list of Best DSLR Cameras is full of excellent options. For most people, and especially for people on a limited budget, digital SLR cameras are still an excellent choice.

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